Signage, Images, and Messaging at the Hollywood Community Job Center

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Signs, Images, and Messaging at the Hollywood Community Job Center

 

The Hollywood Community Job Center, run by IDEPSCA, provides a place for workers to find employment in an organized setting and access resources and services. The center and the surrounding area is full of signs, flags, murals, and various other sorts of messaging from various sources such as the center organizers, the authorities, and the workers themselves. 

 

Photo 1: “No Loitering” signs are posted all along the Home Depot wall, boldly stating “Police Enforced” or, in Spanish, “Police Will Intervene”

 

2: The signs are located every few feet, making sure that everyone who passes by sees them.

 

3: Inside the job center’s office, a bulletin board provides community resources, ranging from services such as computer and English classes, medical services, and legal advice to LGBT support groups and youth transitional programs.

 

4 & 5: A pamphlet explains what you should do if you are stopped by the police, and what your rights are.

 

6: “Stopping for Water Keeps You Going.” This poster, showing an agricultural worker pausing in the fields for a water break next to a water dispenser and shaded tent, reminds workers that their employers are required to provide water, rest, and shade. 

 

7: Inside the office, images of Cesar Chavez and striking farm workers remind viewers of their history and show examples of individuals and groups who fought to protect exploited immigrant workers and improve working conditions.

 

8: Outside the center, on a gate on the perimeter of the property, a landscape mural, probably done by some of the workers themselves, camouflages the alley behind it and provides a pleasant backdrop.

 

9: A religious altar with several statues, including the Virgen de Guadalupe, sits in a corner of the center’s yard.

 

10: Job postings create a hard-copy Craigslist on the center’s outdoor bulletin board, presenting workers with other employment options besides just the employers who come to the center seeking workers.

 

11: Large banners advertise the center to employers—although its location isn’t in one of the most visible areas outside the store.

 

12: Center hours.

 

13: “Group Rules” at the center include assisting during classes, confidentiality, respecting the opinions of others, participation, declaring “I” (presumably, taking responsibility), and turning cell phones on vibrate or silent.

 

14: An American flag covers the wall inside the center.

 

15: Inside the job center’s office, a bulletin board provides community resources, ranging from services such as computer and English classes, medical services, and legal advice to LGBT support groups and youth transitional programs.

 

16: To support the center and bring employers, the workers must participate in a flyer distribution program that advertises the workers available in the area. This map denotes distribution areas for various groups of workers.

 

17: Brightly colored signs advertise workers and “green gardeners” trained in water conservation methods and knowledgeable about less water-intensive plants and methods.

 

18: Another American flag adorns the gate of the center, along with multiple signs advertising workers and providing contact information and the logos of sponsoring organizations.

 

19: “All Workers Welcome” A banner encourages workers to register with the center. Some workers choose to go there and abide by their rules, finding the resources that the center provides valuable. Others choose to remain on the corner, hoping that their increased visibility will lead to more jobs. 

Signage, Images, and Messaging at the Hollywood Community Job Center
Diana
27 Feb 2013 - 8:03pm

 

Signs, Images, and Messaging at the Hollywood Community Job Center

 

The Hollywood Community Job Center, run by IDEPSCA, provides a place for workers to find employment in an organized setting and access resources and services. The center and the surrounding area is full of signs, flags, murals, and various other sorts of messaging from various sources such as the center organizers, the authorities, and the workers themselves. 

 

Photo 1: “No Loitering” signs are posted all along the Home Depot wall, boldly stating “Police Enforced” or, in Spanish, “Police Will Intervene”

 

2: The signs are located every few feet, making sure that everyone who passes by sees them.

 

3: Inside the job center’s office, a bulletin board provides community resources, ranging from services such as computer and English classes, medical services, and legal advice to LGBT support groups and youth transitional programs.

 

4 & 5: A pamphlet explains what you should do if you are stopped by the police, and what your rights are.

 

6: “Stopping for Water Keeps You Going.” This poster, showing an agricultural worker pausing in the fields for a water break next to a water dispenser and shaded tent, reminds workers that their employers are required to provide water, rest, and shade. 

 

7: Inside the office, images of Cesar Chavez and striking farm workers remind viewers of their history and show examples of individuals and groups who fought to protect exploited immigrant workers and improve working conditions.

 

8: Outside the center, on a gate on the perimeter of the property, a landscape mural, probably done by some of the workers themselves, camouflages the alley behind it and provides a pleasant backdrop.

 

9: A religious altar with several statues, including the Virgen de Guadalupe, sits in a corner of the center’s yard.

 

10: Job postings create a hard-copy Craigslist on the center’s outdoor bulletin board, presenting workers with other employment options besides just the employers who come to the center seeking workers.

 

11: Large banners advertise the center to employers—although its location isn’t in one of the most visible areas outside the store.

 

12: Center hours.

 

13: “Group Rules” at the center include assisting during classes, confidentiality, respecting the opinions of others, participation, declaring “I” (presumably, taking responsibility), and turning cell phones on vibrate or silent.

 

14: An American flag covers the wall inside the center.

 

15: Inside the job center’s office, a bulletin board provides community resources, ranging from services such as computer and English classes, medical services, and legal advice to LGBT support groups and youth transitional programs.

 

16: To support the center and bring employers, the workers must participate in a flyer distribution program that advertises the workers available in the area. This map denotes distribution areas for various groups of workers.

 

17: Brightly colored signs advertise workers and “green gardeners” trained in water conservation methods and knowledgeable about less water-intensive plants and methods.

 

18: Another American flag adorns the gate of the center, along with multiple signs advertising workers and providing contact information and the logos of sponsoring organizations.

 

19: “All Workers Welcome” A banner encourages workers to register with the center. Some workers choose to go there and abide by their rules, finding the resources that the center provides valuable. Others choose to remain on the corner, hoping that their increased visibility will lead to more jobs. 

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